Reformed Group Network

A place for small groups to gather, share, connect, and grow.
Reformed Group Network
A place for small groups to gather, share, connect, and grow.

Do we need to “join” the Reformed Group Network (RGN) in order to use its resources?

No. Educational resources and video downloads are available to all.  We do, however, require a group to register with the RGN to apply to participate in events, e.g. summer camps. 

Who is the sponsor of the Reformed Group Network?

The RGN is a resource ministry of the Reformed Church in the United States.

May churches join the RGN?

While the RGN was created with small groups in mind, some churches without a denominational affiliation have chosen to participate in the Reformed Group Network as a way to connect with other Reformed believers and learn more about the Reformed faith.  It has also been a way for churches that have both Reformed and “Reformed Baptists” members to find fellowship as they seek the Lord’s will concerning the future.

If we join the Reformed Group Network, are we “members” of the Reformed Church in the United States (RCUS)?

No, the RGN is simply a place for people to connect, grow, and serve. It does not replace membership in a local church.  Some RGN groups may, however, apply to an RCUS congregation to take spiritual oversight of their group.  In such a case, the group members would go through the church’s membership process and come under the authority of the preaching and teaching ministry of that church, including catechetical instruction of the youth. The group would also have quarterly pastoral visits for the Lord’s Supper, baptisms, elder visitation, etc.  

This is a big step, and if interested, we can help you make the decisions right for you and your group’s families. Contact RGN@RCUS.org

Are there costs involved in joining the RGN?

Joining the RGN is free of charge.  There may be charges associated with mission trips, youth camps, outings, etc. for travel and lodging, etc. 

If our small group joins the RGN, may we use the “Reformed Group Network” or “Reformed Church in the United States” names of logos?

Only RCUS churches and RCUS ministries may use the church’s name and logo.  Once a group comes under the care of an RCUS congregation through membership, it may identify as a member of the RCUS, and use the Reformed Group Network in advertising, for example.

Are there exceptions to this rule?

The Reformed Group Network is relatively new (compared to the RCUS, which is nearly 300 years old).  We are constantly being asked questions we had not anticipated, and so yes, things may change on a case by case basis.  For liability reasons, we simply cannot allow groups that do not have membership status with an RCUS congregation to use the name or logo, and local RGN groups should always ask us, if in doubt. Think of the RGN primarily as a resource unless and until your group seeks a more formal relationship with the Reformed Church.

Are RGN groups covered by the Reformed Church’s insurance?

The Reformed Church in the United States urges its member congregations to take the safety and security of its members and visitors seriously, including such things as background checks for Sunday school teachers. While we encourage small groups to consider such measures, we cannot monitor how well any individual group may of may not be doing in this regard. That is why there is not a legal relationship created or existing when you join the RGN.   Reformed groups remain independent when they join the RGN, and many, if not most may choose to remain so indefinitely, using the RGN as a resource.  As stated previously, if and only if your group wishes to seek a formal association with the Reformed Church, e.g. as an RCUS church plant,  will that independent status change. In the meantime, let’s connect and grow.

Do we need to “join” the Reformed Group Network (RGN) in order to use its resources?

No. Educational resources and video downloads are available to all.  We do, however, require a group to register with the RGN to apply to participate in events, e.g. summer camps. 

Who is the sponsor of the Reformed Group Network?

The RGN is a resource ministry of the Reformed Church in the United States.

May churches join the RGN?

While the RGN was created with small groups in mind, some churches without a denominational affiliation have chosen to participate in the Reformed Group Network as a way to connect with other Reformed believers and learn more about the Reformed faith.  It has also been a way for churches that have both Reformed and “Reformed Baptists” members to find fellowship as they seek the Lord’s will concerning the future.

If we join the Reformed Group Network, are we “members” of the Reformed Church in the United States (RCUS)?

No, the RGN is simply a place for people to connect, grow, and serve. It does not replace membership in a local church.  Some RGN groups may, however, apply to an RCUS congregation to take spiritual oversight of their group.  In such a case, the group members would go through the church’s membership process and come under the authority of the preaching and teaching ministry of that church, including catechetical instruction of the youth. The group would also have quarterly pastoral visits for the Lord’s Supper, baptisms, elder visitation, etc.  

This is a big step, and if interested, we can help you make the decisions right for you and your group’s families. Contact RGN@RCUS.org

Are there costs involved in joining the RGN?

Joining the RGN is free of charge.  There may be charges associated with mission trips, youth camps, outings, etc. for travel and lodging, etc. 

If our small group joins the RGN, may we use the “Reformed Group Network” or “Reformed Church in the United States” names of logos?

Only RCUS churches and RCUS ministries may use the church’s name and logo.  Once a group comes under the care of an RCUS congregation through membership, it may identify as a member of the RCUS, and use the Reformed Group Network in advertising, for example.

Are there exceptions to this rule?

The Reformed Group Network is relatively new (compared to the RCUS, which is nearly 300 years old).  We are constantly being asked questions we had not anticipated, and so yes, things may change on a case by case basis.  For liability reasons, we simply cannot allow groups that do not have membership status with an RCUS congregation to use the name or logo, and local RGN groups should always ask us, if in doubt. Think of the RGN primarily as a resource unless and until your group seeks a more formal relationship with the Reformed Church.

Are RGN groups covered by the Reformed Church’s insurance?

The Reformed Church in the United States urges its member congregations to take the safety and security of its members and visitors seriously, including such things as background checks for Sunday school teachers. While we encourage small groups to consider such measures, we cannot monitor how well any individual group may of may not be doing in this regard. That is why there is not a legal relationship created or existing when you join the RGN.   Reformed groups remain independent when they join the RGN, and many, if not most may choose to remain so indefinitely, using the RGN as a resource.  As stated previously, if and only if your group wishes to seek a formal association with the Reformed Church, e.g. as an RCUS church plant,  will that independent status change. In the meantime, let’s connect and grow.

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